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Any broadband and TV knowledge here?

Old 09-25-2018, 07:48 AM
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Default Any broadband and TV knowledge here?

I have recently completed a full rewire of a property. Facts are as follows:

Broadband and phone line enter the property via a conventional telephone socket.
I have Sky compatible cabling running from adjacent to the above socket to an outside wall but no dish presently fitted (was previously sited in that position)
There is no TV aerial
I have a Sky Q box not connected
I have two smart TVs to locate on the ground floor and one on the first floor
There are a number of solid walls which may hamper WiFi
I have CAT6 cabling running to the three TV positions and a couple of other locations around the property

Sooooo....what is the best way to connect everything up maximising functionality at minimal cost?

I don't want to turn the house into a smart showroom. I won't use that functionality and it's unlikely that a buyer will. I certainly won't get a return on a significant investment.

In essence, I just want Sky to work across the TVs and good WiFi around the property. I also want some wireless CCTV.

Can anyone walk me through what I need in plain English?

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Old 09-25-2018, 08:16 AM
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My home is part wireless part power line, I have an old cottage with thick walls so the Wi-Fi is a partial issue. I use Devolo power line adapters. Mine are dLAN650+ and are adequate for me, plenty fast enough for full HD video streaming, my set up is one for PC Nas server, one upstairs to my smart TV in the main bedroom and a triple one in the living room for the Sky box, NUC PC, and DVD player.
As for wireless CCTV, remember you still need wires to power the cameras, there's plenty of security web sites that can advise you on cameras PVR units etc.
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Old 09-25-2018, 12:11 PM
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Agree with richmc's approach, albeit this is a new build with thinner walls!

I wired a whole bunch of cat 6 sockets during the build intending a big router up in the loft driving a house-wide LAN ... the best laid plans ...

Never did get to buy the expensive hardware. To this day there is a pile of unused cat 6 cables in the loft next to the roof hatch near my 'computer room'.

In the event, my main desktop PC 'computer room' has the main teleco socket and wireless router, cat 6 cable into a powerline network mains plug. This is at one end of the L shape house, upstairs above the garage. Smart TVs, bedroom and lounge, each is on a cat 6 stub cable off a powerline mains network plug. By the main bedroom TV there is also a powerline wifi signal extender (at the other L end: I find teleco-provided wifi router range is not house wide.) Downstairs, the open plan living space is one wing of the L. the main lounge TV on a powerline with cat 6 stub cable and nearby there is another powerline wifi signal extender. Whole house coverage for smart phones now and no complaints since I bought the powerline wifi extenders for upstairs and downstairs.

I use the TP-link products sourced from Amazon, sub £50 each for wifi signal extenders, sub £40 for the cat 6 mains plug jobbies.
Total cost about £200. You can take them with you when you sell, Pete

edit: CCTV is wired so can't help there

Last edited by arsie; 09-25-2018 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 09-25-2018, 01:11 PM
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Thanks for the replies but I don't have a clue what either of you are talking about.

Any chance of a plain English explanation of what I need to do to meet my requirements (I get the bit about power to cameras which isn't an issue)?
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Old 09-25-2018, 03:51 PM
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Ok point taken!

Gad, as you know your internet connection arrives via a telephone (physical) line at a telephone socket. You will also know you connect a 'wireless router' supplied by your internet service provider to get the internet. These usually have a few cat 6 sockets for wired connection, only useful in the same room really. This 'wireless router' also provides a wifi internet signal but often this signal is of limited range or your house walls are too thick for a weak signal to penetrate.

One solution is to make use of your house mains electric wiring to carry your internet signal round the house using 'powerline' adapters, which on the front side have a normal 3-pin mains plug but also have one or more cat 6 socket(s): you plug your router into the cat 6 socket of one of these using a mains socket near the router, to 'transmit' an internet signal. Somewhere else in the house you plug a powerline adapter into another mains socket to 'receive' the internet signal over the power lines, using a short cat 6 cable to connect to e.g. a smart TV or Sky Q box. So in my case, I have (1) a powerline unit 'transmitting' the internet signal from the mains socket by the router, (2) a powerline unit 'receiving' at the mains socket by my first TV, (3) and so on etc etc for more 'receivers'.

The other thing you can do with powerline adapters is extend (re-transmit) your wifi, in which case like a wireless doorbell they just occupy a mains socket. Each extender appears as a new wifi connection on your smart phone (SSID). Password is usually sticker-ed on the front (mains plug side) of the powerline adapter.

Most powerline internet adapters can be bought with a passthru' mains socket on the back or not, so if mains sockets are in short supply you can still use them, in effect. Here is a picture of a starter kit, top of the range that richmc uses, a Devolo. The one on the left would be connected to your router and the other could connect both a TV and a Sky box, as it has two cat 6 sockets, somewhere else on your mains electric wiring. Both of these have a mains socket on the back.

This is the device
for sale on Amazon for sale on Amazon

I suggest you decide what speed you need/price you want to pay, buy a starter kit and use this to get one device working on the internet in the same room as your router, say an old laptop. Once the 'receiving' powerline adapter is paired and working with the 'transmitter' you can move it to the TV or whatever in another room. All is explained in the leaflets enclosed with 'powerline' adapters, in my experience, just RTFM. You will probably need some cat 6 stub cables say 1m or 2m in length with male plugs on both ends. TVs don't usually come with these.

edit:
You mention cat 6 wiring installed. You might be able to use wired connections to TVs from your router depending where the telephone line enters? Diagram please!

Last edited by arsie; 09-26-2018 at 12:45 AM.
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Old 09-25-2018, 10:33 PM
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If you are still able to - run cat6 everywhere you think you may have a device that needs plugging in. The more devices plugged in, the less on the wifi. You will probably need a larger switch to connect all cables to. An 8/16/24, depending on what you run.

If you want multi room viewing - the stuff to be looking at is the HDAnywhere Mhubs, but SkyQ is halfway there anyway!

I wouldn't use powerline adapters - they are ugly, large and not all that fast. To improve the wifi in the house - you the new Mesh technology, Google Home and BT Whole home are leading the field - the BT Whole Home seems to be the surprising leader.

Last edited by nomadicS2k; 09-25-2018 at 10:37 PM.
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Old 09-25-2018, 10:46 PM
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[color=left=#222222]"I wouldn't use powerline adapters - they are ugly, large and not all that fast." I disagree, who sits and stares at a socket? you wont even notice they are there especially if they happen to be behind a sofa! As for slow, they are plenty fast enough to stream 4K TV as my "old" 650+ dLAN handle with ease, modern faster ones will not have a problem. And as arsie said they will relieve the burden on your Wi-Fi bandwidth. I will say I had TP-link adapters at first but found they failed after a couple of years, they may have improved but that's why I swapped to Devolo.[/color]
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Old 09-26-2018, 12:22 AM
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On speed:
you will be limited by your primary internet connection of course but if your powerline internet bandwidth (speed) is greater that will reduce congestion in the house. As an aside, internet providers' boxes are always shit and Sky even worse so I wouldn't trust the 'wireless router' being any good under load and as mentioned wifi signal strength is only any good in a cheap modern prefab with plaster walls IMHO, so best over-egg your internal speed. Another mini project of mine is to go back to my own kit at that crucial point in the house but so far I simply CBA and it would cost a fair bit I think. Just be aware, boxes aren't free for no good reason

On wired versus wifi:
as already mentioned I was a wired fan so installed miles of cat 6 and 24 sockets all around the house, as an old fogie I distrusted wireless back in planning days pre 2009 before smart phones were really everywhere. In reality as we move closer to 2020 a decade later, no one comes into your house wanting to or able to sit down near and be tethered to a cat 6 socket. But everyone expects to be able to camp onto your wifi with smart phones or tablets, use the lights, stay warm, piss in your toilets and flush shit away (have to be tethered for that!!) They are called utilities.

The wasted investment in wiring cat 6 everywhere cost f*ck all at the time. A few hours of monkey time during first fix and some wire/sockets at second fix and some sparkie time. I do use wired technology for the under floor heat zones (14 of em) but with a central physical touchpad controller which I see as part of the house so, when sold, buyer doesn't need to have some hokey app and xyz mobile phone technology to stay in control. Always hated central ceiling lighting, I call it Gestapo light, so there is also an as yet unused 5 amp circuit in the main living space, intended for table lamps wired to light switches US-stylee for as you come in. Haven't got round to connecting 5 amp plugs as yet. A winter mini project one year ... I suppose without all this over configuring I would've come in 2% over budget not 3%

@richmc: Another mini project is to try see if Devolo's kit will interwork with TP-link's, do you know? My original wireless extender, bought 2013, has to be reset a little too often for my liking. Probably the same tech under the covers, all made in China but conforming to US standards and bands

Last edited by arsie; 09-26-2018 at 12:49 AM.
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Old 09-26-2018, 11:09 AM
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If you've got cat5/6 wired and connected everywhere, use it. Homeplugs are a compromise for those who don't have dedicated data cables.

You'll just need cat5/6 patch leads to, in simple terms, plug all your devices (TV's SkyQ etc) into you router. You may need a network switch if you have more devices to plug in than the amount of ports on your router (normally about 4). Also depending on whether the router is located in the same place as where all your data cables run to! Think of the cat5/6 installed in your property as an extension lead!

I'm not really up on Sky, but I heard the new boxes now or will soon not require a dish. They will just require an ethernet connection. I'm not sure how reliable this will be and whether there will be an effect on picture quality/sound quality. I've always struggled watching streaming sports, even with BT Sport or Sky Go and I'm getting around 70Mbps. Always looks 'jerky' to me. Maybe someone else can advise.

If you find your wifi is lacking in certain areas of the house then make use of your cat5 or 6 again and get a wireless access point and plug it into your router via the cat6 wiring in your house and a patch lead at either end.
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Old 09-26-2018, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by mattg4321 View Post
If you've got cat5/6 wired and connected everywhere, use it. Homeplugs are a compromise for those who don't have dedicated data cables.
No, it's not that simple matt.

A classroom is one thing, you know where all the people sit and where you need cat 6 sockets - fixed wiring, no brainer. A house/home isn't so certain usually, and it varies over time and with the occupier. You change furniture and move TVs around. I did ask the OP to explain what ethernet wiring he has available but powerline adapters (let's stick to one term eh) allow more flexibility in a home by taking advantage of an existing infrastructure, the mains electrical wiring, which already has sockets everywhere. Trying to predict where you need cat 6 sockets right at the start of a house build ('first fix') is difficult to get right. You change how you use a house when you live in it. You can't successfully predict this.

edit: that said, with modern big screen TVs you do need coax terrestrial signal sockets so you might be able to build a tight cat 6 network for 4 lines to the wireless router. So my question to the OP about his ethernet wiring is important. He could save spending circa £200 on powerline boxes. Maybe. Small beer in the scheme of things though. you get flexibility with powerline adapters.

Last edited by arsie; 09-26-2018 at 02:01 PM.
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