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Any broadband and TV knowledge here?

 
Old 09-27-2018, 01:29 AM
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I will look at exactly what's there and post some pics later.

I like idea of no dish (so council) but it's not a practical concern as the cable is already in place.

Not sure why I would need coax if I have that cat6 stuff to all tv points?
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Old 09-27-2018, 02:07 AM
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Top left is the TP-link, others Devolo, there are three more Devolo but the only show up when being used as they are in energy saving mode.

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Old 09-27-2018, 02:13 AM
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Originally Posted by gaddafi View Post
I will look at exactly what's there and post some pics later.

I like idea of no dish (so council) but it's not a practical concern as the cable is already in place.

Not sure why I would need coax if I have that cat6 stuff to all tv points?
I remember coax, only of use as a back up if everything else fails, my main TV is Sky satellite or streaming on line, I never bothered to reconnect the coax after decorating. My bedroom TV has a coax connection and also a satellite Freeview box, you can guess what one gets used most, only very bad weather forces me to use the coax.
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Old 09-27-2018, 02:21 AM
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Originally Posted by arsie View Post
No, it's not that simple matt.

A classroom is one thing, you know where all the people sit and where you need cat 6 sockets - fixed wiring, no brainer. A house/home isn't so certain usually, and it varies over time and with the occupier. You change furniture and move TVs around. I did ask the OP to explain what ethernet wiring he has available but powerline adapters (let's stick to one term eh) allow more flexibility in a home by taking advantage of an existing infrastructure, the mains electrical wiring, which already has sockets everywhere. Trying to predict where you need cat 6 sockets right at the start of a house build ('first fix') is difficult to get right. You change how you use a house when you live in it. You can't successfully predict this.

edit: that said, with modern big screen TVs you do need coax terrestrial signal sockets so you might be able to build a tight cat 6 network for 4 lines to the wireless router. So my question to the OP about his ethernet wiring is important. He could save spending circa £200 on powerline boxes. Maybe. Small beer in the scheme of things though. you get flexibility with powerline adapters.
The important part are the conduits not the actual wiring. Technology changes.
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Old 09-27-2018, 02:23 AM
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Originally Posted by arsie View Post
No, it's not that simple matt.

A classroom is one thing, you know where all the people sit and where you need cat 6 sockets - fixed wiring, no brainer. A house/home isn't so certain usually, and it varies over time and with the occupier. You change furniture and move TVs around. I did ask the OP to explain what ethernet wiring he has available but powerline adapters (let's stick to one term eh) allow more flexibility in a home by taking advantage of an existing infrastructure, the mains electrical wiring, which already has sockets everywhere. Trying to predict where you need cat 6 sockets right at the start of a house build ('first fix') is difficult to get right. You change how you use a house when you live in it. You can't successfully predict this.

edit: that said, with modern big screen TVs you do need coax terrestrial signal sockets so you might be able to build a tight cat 6 network for 4 lines to the wireless router. So my question to the OP about his ethernet wiring is important. He could save spending circa £200 on powerline boxes. Maybe. Small beer in the scheme of things though. you get flexibility with powerline adapters.
You don't need coax, it's just there.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by nomadicS2k View Post
If you are still able to - run cat6 everywhere you think you may have a device that needs plugging in. The more devices plugged in, the less on the wifi. You will probably need a larger switch to connect all cables to. An 8/16/24, depending on what you run.

If you want multi room viewing - the stuff to be looking at is the HDAnywhere Mhubs, but SkyQ is halfway there anyway!

I wouldn't use powerline adapters - they are ugly, large and not all that fast. To improve the wifi in the house - you the new Mesh technology, Google Home and BT Whole home are leading the field - the BT Whole Home seems to be the surprising leader.
I have a BT whole home mesh system and its great. It just works and i've only had to restart the system once in the last two years and that was after a powercut. Prior to that I tried a variety of brands of wifi repeaters, signal boosters, power line adapters etc and they just weren't reliable. The BT system gives me proper wifi coverage throughout the whole house and garden and gives me faster wifi speeds than the virgin supplied wifi router. We have a very good internet connection and i see speeds in excess of 100mps throughout the whole house and garden.

To give Gad what he wants, ie SKY channels at each tv, i would suggest going for the sky Q system. But that will require a dish until sky bring out their dishless system that they are supposed to be bringing out at some point in the next 6 months which will be transmitted over the broadband network.

Failing that, a dish on the house with a multiway LNB and use the coax around the house to transmit the satelite signal to each TV. You'd need a sky box or a freeview satellite box with each tv too.

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Old 09-27-2018, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by lower View Post
I have a BT whole home mesh system and its great. It just works and i've only had to restart the system once in the last two years and that was after a powercut. Prior to that I tried a variety of brands of wifi repeaters, signal boosters, power line adapters etc and they just weren't reliable. The BT system gives me proper wifi coverage throughout the whole house and garden and gives me faster wifi speeds than the virgin supplied wifi router. We have a very good internet connection and i see speeds in excess of 100mps throughout the whole house and garden.

To give Gad what he wants, ie SKY channels at each tv, i would suggest going for the sky Q system. But that will require a dish until sky bring out their dishless system that they are supposed to be bringing out at some point in the next 6 months which will be transmitted over the broadband network.

Failing that, a dish on the house with a multiway LNB and use the coax around the house to transmit the satelite signal to each TV. You'd need a sky box or a freeview satellite box with each tv too.
This is the answer, wireless is most definitely the way to go. And this is from someone who prefers the reliability of wires but the reality is that the technology is now well established.

This is well worth a read and explains it nicely: https://www.blog.google/products/goo...sh-your-wi-fi/
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Old 09-27-2018, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by jml View Post
The important part are the conduits not the actual wiring. Technology changes.
What conduit do you mean?

Originally Posted by arsie View Post
No, it's not that simple matt.

A classroom is one thing, you know where all the people sit and where you need cat 6 sockets - fixed wiring, no brainer. A house/home isn't so certain usually, and it varies over time and with the occupier. You change furniture and move TVs around. I did ask the OP to explain what ethernet wiring he has available but powerline adapters (let's stick to one term eh) allow more flexibility in a home by taking advantage of an existing infrastructure, the mains electrical wiring, which already has sockets everywhere. Trying to predict where you need cat 6 sockets right at the start of a house build ('first fix') is difficult to get right. You change how you use a house when you live in it. You can't successfully predict this.

edit: that said, with modern big screen TVs you do need coax terrestrial signal sockets so you might be able to build a tight cat 6 network for 4 lines to the wireless router. So my question to the OP about his ethernet wiring is important. He could save spending circa £200 on powerline boxes. Maybe. Small beer in the scheme of things though. you get flexibility with powerline adapters.
I stand by my opinion that power line adaptors/homeplugs are a compromise for when you don't have wired data cables in place or a suitable wifi connection. Gad did say he had data cables run to each of his TV points already.
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Old 09-27-2018, 09:10 AM
  #19  
 
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Originally Posted by lower View Post
I have a BT whole home mesh system and its great. It just works and i've only had to restart the system once in the last two years and that was after a powercut. Prior to that I tried a variety of brands of wifi repeaters, signal boosters, power line adapters etc and they just weren't reliable. The BT system gives me proper wifi coverage throughout the whole house and garden and gives me faster wifi speeds than the virgin supplied wifi router. We have a very good internet connection and i see speeds in excess of 100mps throughout the whole house and garden.

To give Gad what he wants, ie SKY channels at each tv, i would suggest going for the sky Q system. But that will require a dish until sky bring out their dishless system that they are supposed to be bringing out at some point in the next 6 months which will be transmitted over the broadband network.

Failing that, a dish on the house with a multiway LNB and use the coax around the house to transmit the satelite signal to each TV. You'd need a sky box or a freeview satellite box with each tv too.
Interesting thoughts on the BT mesh system. I've never used this or anything similar, but it sounds good. I think I'd still rather have a wired wifi access point though. Proven reliability over many years and used in pretty much every commercial space everywhere! This of course assumes you have cat6 run and terminated in the correct place. Most don't, so the mesh system sounds far better than a repeater to me, which I agree are [email protected]

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Old 09-27-2018, 09:43 AM
  #20  
 
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Unifi do something similar to the BT system as do Cisco with their WAP121 and WAP131 deviecs.

I have a mix of wired and wireless, a 'smart' TV in the lounge and SkyQ to split the Skybox into the other room from the lounge.

It won't be long before all you want to watch is broadcasted via the internet so you'll never need a dish again, you will just pay for whatever you want to view. If you don't mind catchup, you can get most of the terrestrial stuff on the internet anyway and for films there is Netflix / Amazon Prime. In fact if you have a Sky account, you can watch most of their stuff on the web portal anyway so not even sure you have to use a dish even though you might nominally pay for one.
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