The cost of our future with the EU - Page 2 - S2KI Honda S2000 Forums

Notices
Off Topic and General Discussion Off topic forum - Serious discussion, Current Affairs, News, Help & Advice
View Poll Results: What will the UK give the EU every year as a rule taker only
£20 billion or more
0
0%
£15 billion
2
20.00%
£10 billion
1
10.00%
£5 billion
1
10.00%
WGAF we will leave for nothing
6
60.00%
Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

The cost of our future with the EU

 
Old 09-22-2018, 12:43 PM
  #11  
 
unclefester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Herts some place
Posts: 12,579
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Default

https://www.marklines.com/en/statist...lesfig_uk_2018

Just one small example - but it makes for interesting reading.

I don't know the in and out of the supply chain for UK "made" cars but i would imagine it's far too complex for either side to really afford a no deal deal.
unclefester is offline  
Old 09-23-2018, 12:04 AM
  #12  
 
richmc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Costa del Cornwall
Posts: 7,837
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by unclefester View Post
https://www.marklines.com/en/statist...lesfig_uk_2018

Just one small example - but it makes for interesting reading.

I don't know the in and out of the supply chain for UK "made" cars but i would imagine it's far too complex for either side to really afford a no deal deal.
Also -
From the AA

British ownedMade in Britain
  • MINI – MINI, MINI Clubman and MINI Countryman, in Cowley, Oxford
  • Honda – Civic and CR-V in Swindon
  • Toyota – Auris, Auris hybrid and Avensis in Burnaston, Derbyshire
  • Nissan – Juke, Qashqai, Note and Leaf and Infiniti Q30 in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear
  • Lotus – Elise, Evora and Exige in Norfolk
  • Aston Martin – DB9, Vantage, Rapide, Vanquish, and DB11 in Gaydon, Warwickshire
  • Bentley Motors – Continental, Flying Spur and Mulsanne in Crewe, Cheshire
  • Rolls Royce – Ghost and Wraith in Goodwood, West Sussex
  • Jaguar – F-Pace and XE in Solihull, and F-type, XJ, XF and XE in Castle Bromwich, Birmingham
  • Land Rover – Discovery Sport and Range Rover Evoque in Halewood, Merseyside, and Range Rover, Range Rover Sport and Land Rover Defender in Solihull, West Midlands
  • Vauxhall – Astra at Ellesmere Port and Vivaro van in Luton
[COLOR=left=#21252d]Other niche, small volume manufacturers include Westfield, Bristol, Ariel and Noble. [/COLOR]

[COLOR=left=#21252d]Ford stopped building cars in the UK in 2002 and vans (Transits) in July 2013 but continues to manufacture engines in Bridgend and Dagenham and transmissions in Halewood.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=left=#21252d]27 December 2017

So you can say if you want to be patriotic you have a choice of a handful of producers of expensive and impractical cars. we have sold England (Britain) by the pound and its going to be very hard to get back. OK the list of cars manufactured in the UK is impressive but only in regards of employment and tax revenue, the profits go to companies outside the UK, a lot of them are threatening to withdraw production from the UK.
We need British companies, British owned companies, producing British goods in the UK. Not just cars but everything you can think of, Wilson had his I'm backing Britain campaign with a Union flag logo on British produced items. Now supermarkets by law have to show country of origin on all food products they sell, why not extend that to all products.
The most popular car sold in the UK the Ford Fiesta................built in [/COLOR]Brazil, Mexico, China, India and South Africa and Europe (but not the UK).

The best way to stave off negative brexit effects is to start producing in the UK, cut down on imports especially from the EU who presumably will think they have us by the nuts, start favouring non EU based suppliers, and get exporting home grown products. But then we will need a PM and government with balls and vision. I've said all along the reason a majority of MP's are anti brexit is simply that they will have to get of their backsides and do some work for a change, instead of letting the EU make our laws and rules, whilst they enjoy the gravy train at our expense.

Last edited by richmc; 09-23-2018 at 12:06 AM.
richmc is offline  
Old 09-23-2018, 12:25 AM
  #13  
 
unclefester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Herts some place
Posts: 12,579
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Default

Best we don't mention who owns the majority shares in gas / water / oil and electricity supply then .......
unclefester is offline  
Old 09-23-2018, 03:11 AM
  #14  
 
Nick Graves's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Hertford
Posts: 30,863
Thanks: 0
Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by arsie View Post
Looks like Gaddafi is right. Chequers has been rejected by the EU Council as cherry picking i.e. common rules on goods but us freewheeling on services. Also, the EU doesn't go for us collecting their customs duties and managing refunds - which a recent study reckoned would cost (us) a lot. On the NI border issue I see the EU moving towards our 'solve by IT' fantasy for what was always an invented issue to keep us on the hop.

I see the 'cherry picking' and 'customs collection' as points of principle for the EU and they won't budge on these, being wedded to the so-called freedoms on principle. If the Maybot includes services in the common rule book and suggests we remain in the EU customs union to concede these EU objections, we might as well never have left the EU and won't be able to strike our own trade deals. We will be a fully fledged rule taker with no voting rights (not that it ever made a difference we lost every issue we fought.) Barnier heard Gove say recently 'we can change it later' so he will bind us in perpetuity, never mind the UK's constitutional rules.

All that will remain (!) then will be to hear from the EU, what is their index-linked price for everlasting slavery?

We may (!) now see a general election - and sooner rather than later.

Not holding my breath though.
I suspect they're all playing silly little games and it's not helped that they apparently cannot tell the difference between a Customs Union and the Single Market. Can they all really be that thick?

It's too esoteric for most, admittedly.

It's more likely Occam than Machiavelli, conventional wisdom might tell us.

But the upshot is, Norway's in the SM but not the CU and thus can safely ignore ~70% of the acquis legislation and not have the other problems mentioned heretofore. But since that was ruled out in the beginning before they'd done any research, the easy option's politically impossible. They might lose face instead of merely looking like a right BoCs.

Nick Graves is offline  
Old 09-23-2018, 08:31 AM
  #15  
 
richmc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Costa del Cornwall
Posts: 7,837
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts
Default

Trouble is Nick, all these doom-sayer news papers/bankers/economists/remoaners etc. have never played a game of poker in their lives and don't understand the concept of hiding your cards. Or just want to stand over Mays shoulder, shouting what cards the UK really have.
richmc is offline  
Old 09-23-2018, 08:34 AM
  #16  
 
richmc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Costa del Cornwall
Posts: 7,837
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by unclefester View Post
Best we don't mention who owns the majority shares in gas / water / oil and electricity supply then .......
Don't get me started on that one Fester! I'll have them all nationalised at a swipe, and no compensation.
It's not so much who owns the shares, but the countries they are from.
richmc is offline  
 
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Shiskine
Off Topic and General Discussion
134
12-07-2015 12:45 AM
2002S2K
Money and Investing
8
10-03-2008 03:15 PM


Quick Reply: The cost of our future with the EU


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands