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New Garage - nucrete?

Old 09-06-2018, 06:19 AM
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Default New Garage - nucrete?

Moving into a new house in a few weeks, first order of the day is building a double garage for my toys!

I'm stuck between choosing a traditional brick garage and going for one of these pre-fab concrete jobs by a company called Nucrete (other companies do them too).

No experience with anything but good old brick efforts myself and was hoping to hear some advice from those with the concrete garages.

One major aspect I like with the nucrete garage is they pop the sum-bitch up complete in one day, obviously with the cement floor having been already laid for them to work on.

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Old 09-06-2018, 11:01 AM
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i dont think there's a comparison to be had to be blunt, a good brick build will last for years, it'll be insulated and dry and you could heat it but it'll cost a lot more

only reason i'd get concrete would be limited budget and even then it's short sighted imo. i'd never do it
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Old 09-07-2018, 03:25 AM
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Dampness & dustiness would put me off, too.

You could block one and attach insulated external cladding (with a proper roof) and have a virtual house.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:53 AM
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Doing what you say Nick is the worst of both worlds in my opinion. Impervious nucrete won't work well with 'normal' building materials cover & methods.

Buildings need to breathe and let some moisture out. I think as Jason (Nottm) says, if you're going to build a proper draught proof insulated structure than that is what you should do. Of course it will cost proper building sums of money which is probably what the OP is wishing to avoid. If he is a fit young person and not susceptible to respiratory ailments etc then it is perhaps the best choice. Although would you want to keep/store an S2000 in a cold humid garage?

On a property value note, a built garage added to a property will return the expense in added value. I don't think a nucrete shelter would do that.

Basically yer pays yer money and yer takes yer pick

Last edited by arsie; 09-07-2018 at 05:59 AM.
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Old 09-07-2018, 06:58 AM
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My house has an old style concrete garage for the moment, it does the job but I run a dehumidifier in there to ensure it doesn't get damp and effect my tools, motorbike etc.

When I rebuild it then it would be of stone/brick
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Old 09-07-2018, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by arsie View Post
Doing what you say Nick is the worst of both worlds in my opinion. Impervious nucrete won't work well with 'normal' building materials cover & methods.

Buildings need to breathe and let some moisture out. I think as Jason (Nottm) says, if you're going to build a proper draught proof insulated structure than that is what you should do. Of course it will cost proper building sums of money which is probably what the OP is wishing to avoid. If he is a fit young person and not susceptible to respiratory ailments etc then it is perhaps the best choice. Although would you want to keep/store an S2000 in a cold humid garage?

On a property value note, a built garage added to a property will return the expense in added value. I don't think a nucrete shelter would do that.

Basically yer pays yer money and yer takes yer pick
Blockwork, not precast, Rog.

Best thing to do with precast is to put a Sitemaster through it.
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Nick Graves View Post
Blockwork, not precast, Rog.

Best thing to do with precast is to put a Sitemaster through it.
Agree - I wouldn't have that as my internal cavity wall Or insulated external cladding - Grenfell anyone?
Precast doesn't even make good hard core foundation for ground works, drives etc.
Ship it off to China - no, wait, they don't take our landfill any more ...
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Old 09-10-2018, 03:12 AM
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External insulated can work pretty well indeed, as long as you don't do a 'Towering inferno' with the specification.

About the only use for precast is it can make 'security garages' harder to beak into - presuming you put a hard roof on it and a very strong door. Otherwise it's no better than timber-frame, which can be cheap and quick.
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Old 09-10-2018, 03:47 AM
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I have a Compton (now Lidget) pre-fab type thing and have done so for many years. It's a bit drafty so not too bad on the damp front, but it does get a bit dusty as a result.

I'd like to get the floor smoothed out at some point but it serves the purpose of keeping the worst of the weather/UV light off the car.

https://www.lidget.co.uk/our-buildings/pent-garages/
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