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Has anyone got experience with the Tarox 10-pot front brake kit?

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Has anyone got experience with the Tarox 10-pot front brake kit?

Old 03-27-2016, 06:45 PM
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Default Has anyone got experience with the Tarox 10-pot front brake kit?

I'm getting ready to purchase a Tarox 10-pot front brake kit and wondered if anyone here has had an experience with them in the US that they may tell me about.

I've already spoken with two guys from the UK and one from Spain with positive feedback.
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Old 04-25-2016, 10:13 PM
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Not trying to be a jerk but even 6 Pistons is overkill on an s2000. How much is the torax kit? I feel like a more proven company like Essex/AP racing or stoptech if you want a big brake kit would be a better idea.

Edit: In an effort to be a bit more helpful, ill provide some reasoning as to why 10 pistons is far to many.

To start out, the OEM brakes are very good with a single piston, driven on the street they are perfectly capable of stoping the vehicle many times in a row and pads and rotors last 50k+ miles. For a street car there is zero reason to change the calipers other than for looks. As you transition from street to performance driving you will eventually reach the thermal limits of the brake system. To combat the extra thermal load you need to provide a combination of extra thermal mass & cooling. As a large potion of the energy goes into the pad, part of the mass should come from a larger brake pad. As the brake pad gets longer (wider isn't usually possible) additional pistons may be required to provide even clamping on the pad to prevent taper. You would need a MASSIVE pad to require 5 pistons per side. Additionally the caliper will be much heavier than needed.
if you are just doing it for looks perhaps a spoon caliper or J's racing would be more proven and better performing. You could put the savings toward more mods as well (I'm assuming 10 piston = $$$$$)
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Old 04-26-2016, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by gregrocks View Post


Not trying to be a jerk but even 6 Pistons is overkill on an s2000. How much is the torax kit? I feel like a more proven company like Essex/AP racing or stoptech if you want a big brake kit would be a better idea.

Edit: In an effort to be a bit more helpful, ill provide some reasoning as to why 10 pistons is far to many.

To start out, the OEM brakes are very good with a single piston, driven on the street they are perfectly capable of stoping the vehicle many times in a row and pads and rotors last 50k+ miles. For a street car there is zero reason to change the calipers other than for looks. As you transition from street to performance driving you will eventually reach the thermal limits of the brake system. To combat the extra thermal load you need to provide a combination of extra thermal mass & cooling. As a large potion of the energy goes into the pad, part of the mass should come from a larger brake pad. As the brake pad gets longer (wider isn't usually possible) additional pistons may be required to provide even clamping on the pad to prevent taper. You would need a MASSIVE pad to require 5 pistons per side. Additionally the caliper will be much heavier than needed.
if you are just doing it for looks perhaps a spoon caliper or J's racing would be more proven and better performing. You could put the savings toward more mods as well (I'm assuming 10 piston = $$$$$)
I think he was just looking for feedback from experience. The kit looks to be well made. Its 10 very small pistons that would very evenly distribute the load without adding much volume to the caliper. Its definitely a different approach. But doesn't mean it won't work.

Hopefully OP finds someone that has experience with it.
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Old 04-26-2016, 05:30 AM
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Why stop at 10...they have a 16-piston caliper!
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Old 04-26-2016, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by B serious View Post
I think he was just looking for feedback from experience. The kit looks to be well made. Its 10 very small pistons that would very evenly distribute the load without adding much volume to the caliper. Its definitely a different approach. But doesn't mean it won't work.

Hopefully OP finds someone that has experience with it.
My point is that the brake pad has a ~3/16" steel backing plate that is extremely stiff. If you have a normal size a 4-piston caliper is more than enough to evenly distribute the pad pressure. With a very long pad then maybe 6 pistons is helpful. Unless your pad is MASSIVE there is 0 reason to need 10 pistons. All these do is add more complications, expense and failure points to a system that works extremely well in 1, 2, 4 or 6 piston form
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Old 04-26-2016, 10:27 AM
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If you're doing this BBK purely for aesthetic reasons then stop reading here as it doesn't matter what you put on the car. If you actually plan to use your car aggressively on street or take it to a track I think it's worth it to reconsider your options and here is why:

1. 10 pistons is too many- ever wonder why all the top tier brands actually used in motorsport don't make anything beyond a 6-piston? It's because the point of diminishing returns is usually 4 pistons unless the pad and caliper are unusually large. Beyond 4-piston you start increasing weight, losing caliper stiffness and most importantly it becomes exponentially harder to maintain even fluid pressure distribution across every piston, which has it's own negative consequences. What this means is that on paper you can adjust the total piston area to maintain the bias you're looking for, but in practice it's not accurate. PFC says the only reason they make 6-piston is because it is required by the rules for some of the series they supply calipers for.

2. Brake pad variety- People constantly underestimate the importance of proper brake pads for their needs. I would argue that the brake pad compound alone accounts for 80-90% of how you perceive your brake system's performance. I would much rather have crappy calipers with great pads than to have the best calipers in the world with crappy pads. Buying any BBK that uses calipers with a poor and/or limited pad selection is shooting yourself in the foot, IMO.

3. Consumables cost and availability- If you track the car often it is very important to consider the cost and availability of replacement parts as well. If replacement rings/hardware is expensive and difficult to source then you could be caught out. What about caliper rebuild kits? If you can't service calipers yourself is there anyone around you who will for a reasonable cost? The cost replacement pads is another big thing to consider since those will almost always be your largest brake related consumable with track use.

This post isn't meant to bash on anyones preferences but rather to bring a few points to attention if they haven't already been considered. Ultimately it's your car and your money so please do what you want, this is just my .02

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Old 04-26-2016, 10:35 AM
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Well put Matt
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Old 04-27-2016, 06:14 PM
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If you havent cracked a rotor, you dont need bigger brakes on thos car.

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Old 04-29-2016, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by gregrocks View Post
Not trying to be a jerk but even 6 Pistons is overkill on an s2000. How much is the torax kit? I feel like a more proven company like Essex/AP racing or stoptech if you want a big brake kit would be a better idea.

Edit: In an effort to be a bit more helpful, ill provide some reasoning as to why 10 pistons is far to many.

To start out, the OEM brakes are very good with a single piston, driven on the street they are perfectly capable of stoping the vehicle many times in a row and pads and rotors last 50k+ miles. For a street car there is zero reason to change the calipers other than for looks. As you transition from street to performance driving you will eventually reach the thermal limits of the brake system. To combat the extra thermal load you need to provide a combination of extra thermal mass & cooling. As a large potion of the energy goes into the pad, part of the mass should come from a larger brake pad. As the brake pad gets longer (wider isn't usually possible) additional pistons may be required to provide even clamping on the pad to prevent taper. You would need a MASSIVE pad to require 5 pistons per side. Additionally the caliper will be much heavier than needed.
if you are just doing it for looks perhaps a spoon caliper or J's racing would be more proven and better performing. You could put the savings toward more mods as well (I'm assuming 10 piston = $$)
Allow me to pose the original question:
HAS ANYONE GOT EXPERIENCE WITH THE TAROX 10-POINT FRONT BRAKE KIT?

Did you not read that query? Your response does not even say "Yes" or "No" (which is the more than likely condition).

I could not care less what your opinion on braking is nor did I ask for it. I am not seeking advice. I'm seeking EXPERIENCE.
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Old 04-29-2016, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by B serious View Post
I think he was just looking for feedback from experience. The kit looks to be well made. Its 10 very small pistons that would very evenly distribute the load without adding much volume to the caliper. Its definitely a different approach. But doesn't mean it won't work.

Hopefully OP finds someone that has experience with it.
Thankfully, someone actually read my post. Thank you.
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