S2000 Under The Hood S2000 Technical and Mechanical discussions.

Gearbox oil recommendation?

 
Old 10-26-2018, 03:09 PM
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I was pleasantly surprised at the cold temp operation of the Amsoil MTF, it worked flawlessly, and I never had to baby it from first start, just drove away on cold start and it worked perfectly. For some odd reason it worked better than the Honda MTF2 despite the Honda fluid being thinner. It must have something to do with the synthetic base of the Amsoil. Just my experience.
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Old 10-26-2018, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by zeroptzero View Post
I was pleasantly surprised at the cold temp operation of the Amsoil MTF, it worked flawlessly, and I never had to baby it from first start, just drove away on cold start and it worked perfectly. For some odd reason it worked better than the Honda MTF2 despite the Honda fluid being thinner. It must have something to do with the synthetic base of the Amsoil. Just my experience.
okay cool. Sounds like a good alternative to me. And no downsides at all?
is the full name:

Amsoil Manual Synchromesh Transmission Fluid MTF?

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Old 10-26-2018, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by simons View Post
okay cool. Sounds like a good alternative to me. And no downsides at all?
is the full name:

Amsoil Manual Synchromesh Transmission Fluid MTF?

yes that is it, no downside to using the fluid, worked better in all conditions.
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Old 10-26-2018, 04:43 PM
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i've run Amsoil MTF too, love it. never had any trouble. i change it every two years, which is probably over kill for how few miles i put on mine lately. but it's great.
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Old 10-26-2018, 10:09 PM
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FWIW, maybe your drop in fuel economy has nothing to do with the MTF you use. Up here we have summer blend gas and winter blend gas; the latter is noticeably worse for fuel economy.
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Old 10-27-2018, 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by alSpeed2k View Post
FWIW, maybe your drop in fuel economy has nothing to do with the MTF you use. Up here we have summer blend gas and winter blend gas; the latter is noticeably worse for fuel economy.
I once heard such a thing as a rumour, Ill see if I can get this confirmed anywhere.
Any idea what they change to it? How much worse does it get over there with winter blend?
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Old 10-27-2018, 04:49 AM
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1. From the USA AAA:
What is the Difference between Summer- and Winter-Blend Gasoline?

Every spring gas prices seem to skyrocket to the highest prices of the year. Why does this happen? In explanation, we hear the experts say that many of the refineries are “down for maintenance while transitioning from winter-blend to summer-blend gasoline,” but what does this mean?

The difference between summer- and winter-blend gasoline involves the Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) of the fuel. RVP is a measure of how easily the fuel evaporates at a given temperature. The more volatile a gasoline (higher RVP), the easier it evaporates.

Winter-blend fuel has a higher RVP because the fuel must be able to evaporate at low temperatures for the engine to operate properly, especially when the engine is cold. If the RVP is too low on a frigid day, the vehicle will be hard to start and once started, will run rough.

Summer-blend gasoline has a lower RVP to prevent excessive evaporation when outside temperatures rise. Reducing the volatility of summer gas decreases emissions that can contribute to unhealthy ozone and smog levels. A lower RVP also helps prevent drivability problems such as vapor lock on hot days, especially in older vehicles.

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says conventional summer-blend gasoline contains 1.7 percent more energy than winter-blend gas, which is one reason why gas mileage is slightly better in the summer. However, the summer-blend is also more expensive to produce, and that cost is passed on to the motorist.

The switch between the two fuels happens twice a year, once in the fall (to winter-blend) and again in the spring (to summer-blend). The changeover requires significant work at refineries, so oil companies schedule their maintenance for those times when they will already be “down” for the blend switches.

As a consumer, the main thing to understand is that there are real reasons for the switch from winter- to summer-blend fuel, even if it results in some pain at the pump.
2. Normal service gearbox oil change: "Every 120,000miles (192,000 km) or every 6 years, whichever comes first." Severe service is half that interval. Seems unlikely anyone on this forum waits that long.

3. Normal differential service: "Every 30,000miles (48,000 km) or every 2 years, whichever comes first." Severe service is half that interval. The S2000 is the only car I've owned in the past few decades I can recall needing a differential oil change.

#1 was found in a 3 second Google search (faster than the roof comes down in the S2000) and #2 and #3 are in your owner's manual. .

-- Chuck
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:02 AM
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I also did lots of research. And was going to buy the mt90 or the GM syncromesh

I ended up getting the Honda MTF, I read by Billman that those thicker oils might not get into the tiny crevices of the tranny, I have used my MTF for a bunch of track days and mountain runs without issues, I just have to wait for it to warm up before banging gears. And I change it every 15k km so it stays fresh
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:16 AM
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Chuck's post is instructive. Brings us down to reality. Speaking for myself, I suspect I do a lot of unnecessary work/maintenance on my S just because I enjoy working on it.

I have Amsoil in my gear box now and I like it. But, it could be that none of this stuff about this oil and that oil amounts to a hill of beans. We change old oil for new oil and it seems better, so we assume the new oil is better than the old oil, when in fact its probably all perfectly good.
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:21 AM
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You could run almost any 75w-80 GL4 or even 75 W GL4 in the transmission. Hondas MTF is 75w-80 if i remember correctly.
Compare the cold viscosity on the datasheets available from the oil manufacturers to select the oil with the thinnest cold viscosity, this will give you much more smoth shifting from start on.

If you like shifts like silk, no matter wich oil you use, give this a try: https://shop.liqui-moly.de/additive/...l-additiv.html
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