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Wheel hub still squeaking after bearing change

 
Old 03-14-2019, 04:33 AM
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Default Wheel hub still squeaking after bearing change

So I recently changed the drivers side rear wheel hub and bearing with new OEM parts due to it making a loud speed dependent squeak, indicative of a bad wheel bearing

But now , its been a couple hundred miles since the swap, and the squeak is coming back. Same as before, its speed dependent, gets louder if turning right, and does not go away while applying brakes.

Could the new bearing be going bad already ? Or could I have done the install wrong ? I made sure to follow the DIY from Rob Robinette, I supported the new bearing from the outer race and used a bearing die when pressing the bearing in , and supporting the inside race with another die when pressing the hub into the bearing. I also did not forget the snap ring

The only things I can think of that might be the problem is when I pressed the hub into the bearing I pressed it until it stopped moving easily with the press, but I did not give it more pressure since I was afraid of deforming the race, so possibly the new hub might not be fully seated ? Also when putting the axle nut back on, I used a new axle nut and mistakenly tightened it to 250 ft/lbs as measured by my digital torque adapter, then tightened it 60° from there, I did notice that even after tightening it to 60° past 250 ft/lbs, the axle nut was still easy to tighten down more, not to say that it was loose, but it was definitely harder to get the old axle nut to 250 ft/lbs than it was to get the new one to 60° past 250 ft/lbs, this could be due to switching what i was using to grease the face of the axle nut
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:34 AM
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60 deg past 250LB?!?!?!
Cot dang, boy.
Its like 180LB initial. And 60 deg isnt a fixed target. A lot of people have broken their axle after doing 180LB+60deg.

You probably damaged the axle stub. That would explain the ease of turning.

If you went past the axle stub's yield point, it...it would also explain your noise.

This 60 degree madness is killing parts at a record rate.

Are you sure you installed the bearing properly? correct placement of press and support cups?

Are you using a new hub with the new bearing?

Last edited by B serious; 03-14-2019 at 10:40 AM.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by B serious View Post
60 deg past 250LB?!?!?!
Cot dang, boy.
Its like 180LB initial. And 60 deg isnt a fixed target. A lot of people have broken their axle after doing 180LB+60deg.

You probably damaged the axle stub. That would explain the ease of turning.

If you went past the axle stub's yield point, it...it would also explain your noise.

This 60 degree madness is killing parts at a record rate.

Are you sure you installed the bearing properly? correct placement of press and support cups?

Are you using a new hub with the new bearing?
New OEM parts for the bearing and hub from hardtopguy

Yeah I had a brain fart on the initial torque value for the axle nut, the new nut didn't have the stake or torque marker that the factory nut hat , so I pulled the 250 lb/ft value from memory and went 60° past there.

I'm pretty sure I did the bearing install properly, pretty much the same as the DIY from RR, with the exception that I supported the inner race when pressing the hub in.

I can pull the knuckle off and inspect the axle, is there anything that would be a good indicator that the axle stub is RIP
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:17 AM
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From memory, this is how I pressed it....
-Push the bearing into the spindle. Support the spindle and press on the OUTER bearing race.
-Push the hub in while supporting the INNER bearing race (spindle floating).

As far as the 60 deg method...y'all are out of y'all minds.

Read the fine print. 60 deg is a "guideline". For someone that knows the feel of when the hub nuts are tight. Don't just blindly use 60 deg.

Torque tension relationships have MASSIVE amounts of variables.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:19 AM
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In the future id just forgo the 60 degree part and stick with the 250lb. I've never found I needed to exceed this. If you still get the infamous axle popping when going from forward to reverse, then snug it up a little more. But yeah 250lb plus 60 degrees is like over 400lb, just seems unwarranted in my experience and risky.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:22 AM
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loosen the axle nut. if its not capable of holding torque or if the nut comes off rough....then ya probably done stretched it.

Remember that the stub isn't made to C10.9 fastener spec. This is one of the reasons that Honda uses a conservative torque value. It also has to withstand torsional loads and additonal tension load from cornering and driving and bumps, etc.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by B serious View Post
loosen the axle nut. if its not capable of holding torque or if the nut comes off rough....then ya probably done stretched it.

Remember that the stub isn't made to C10.9 fastener spec. This is one of the reasons that Honda uses a conservative torque value. It also has to withstand torsional loads and additonal tension load from cornering and driving and bumps, etc.

I'll check it tonight. Thanks for the info
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by s2000Junky View Post
In the future id just forgo the 60 degree part and stick with the 250lb. I've never found I needed to exceed this. If you still get the infamous axle popping when going from forward to reverse, then snug it up a little more. But yeah 250lb plus 60 degrees is like over 400lb, just seems unwarranted in my experience and risky.
Unfortunately, it doesn't correlate to Degrees = LB-FT.

OP also said that the axle nut was easy to turn to 60 deg after 250LB.

None of what anyone is doing correlates to a stable tension value. Which is hilarious and ironic...because tension is the only thing you're after. Torque is just the shitty, unreliable Lewis and Clarke era directions you use to get there.

Like if I told you the way to get to your desired destination was to "drive northwest for like 5 mins". The best you can hope for is to end up in the right neighborhood or general area.

Plus, this 60 degree method has resulted in as many failures as it has resulted in people who have "ZERO problems" in their lives. Which means that EVEN WHEN done with a trained hand...180+60 is right about at the cusp of how much tension the axle can handle without breaking. Insanity.

I agree with your statement that one should start around 250LB to check if that provides enough tension. If not...then incrementally increase from there using a few degrees at a time until the bearing is quiet.

Stopping there is key. No need to "give 'er a couple more ugga duggas".

Last edited by B serious; 03-14-2019 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by G4Z808 View Post
I'll check it tonight. Thanks for the info

Loosen and the re-tighten the axle nut**
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Old 03-15-2019, 05:17 AM
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So I removed and re-tightened the axle-nut last night. It had no problems loosening or tightening back to 250 ft/lbs . Inspecting the axle stub looked ok AFAIK

I did try tilting the hub laterally and horizontally but it didn't budge. But while doing this I did notice that spinning the axle made a squeaking that sounds like what its doing at speed. If the problem is that the rotor is warped, would it still be making this sound while braking? On my drive to work today I noticed the sound was still there, and it still squeaked while under moderate braking. I inspected both surfaces of the rotor and didn't notice any unusual wear


Last edited by G4Z808; 03-15-2019 at 05:20 AM.
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