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Vintage men- I have met my prostate,

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Vintage men- I have met my prostate,

 
Old 10-02-2013, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
Why would they not sedate you for your last biopsy? I do not understand why the medical community does not use versed or propofol for the more uncomfortable procedures. Men everywhere have noted the discomfort with this procedure. Granted sedation is costly, may have to be done in a different setting, medications can cause side effects, etc., but I don't get why they are so stingy with the drugs whey they know they will be inflicting pain. As far as any MRI's, pass the valium please, especially if foreign objects are situated in any orifice of mine.
My drug of choice (especially if an orifice is involved) is versed. I remember nothing for days before and days after being given that hypnotic wonder drug.
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Old 10-02-2013, 03:27 PM
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Damn, Dean, you make mammograms and pap smears for cervical cancer sound like a walk in the park, compared to what you've been going through.

I know Chapter Three isn't out yet but I sure hope it's a great success story.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Morris View Post
kgf3076, that consensus is certainly correct. Most prostate cancers are slow growing and appear at an age when you don't have that much time left. However, mine appears not to be a slow growing cancer and I don't even qualify for medicare yet. Since 3 of 4 grandparents lived to be in their 90s, I agreed with both of my urologists that I should do something now before it leaves the prostate and goes somewhere else. If that happens treatment can be much more difficult, or even useless.
If you are diagnosed at a younger age with the fast growing type, I certainly agree that you should definitely look into actively fighting it. (Microsurgery is your friend and you won't even have to start stocking up on Depends).
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Old 10-03-2013, 08:53 AM
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Chapter 3


There are several treatment options, to include surgery, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy active surveillance, and probably more, depending on who you talk to. My counseling session covered only two, surgery and radiation, and that’s all I will discuss here. If you have knowledge to share about other options, please comment. I know that some people think you can beat anything if you watch what you eat, or eat only certain types of foods. I cannot say they are wrong, only that it isn’t my choice.

The doctor leans towards surgery because, guess what-- that’s what he does. If you spoke to a radiologist, you’d probably get his or her bias in that direction. I have been reading and thinking about this day for four years, and already made my decision that if I needed treatment, it would be surgery. Number 1 reason is that I want it OUT. No carrying it around inside me any longer than I have to. Number 2 is the side effects of radiation which I don’t like. Number 3 is the long term ability to be sexually active. With surgery, at least in cases where it hasn’t progressed far, sexual function is expected to return in months and continue to improve. With radiation, you keep sexual function at first, then it starts declining. The crossover point is about two years out. In two years I will be 66 and I hope I am still the horny bastard I am today. So I’m looking at the long-term.

I almost left this section out. But what’s uncomfortable for me, someone may need to hear, so here goes, in brief. There are nerves around the prostate that control your ability for erection, therefore sexual functioning. If those nerves have been invaded with the cancer, they will be removed along with your ability to have an erection in the natural way. In my case, at least 50% of the nerves should survive the surgery, maybe more. Everybody is going to be different.

The other result of surgery, and also with radiation eventually, is incontinence. That can last from a few weeks after surgery to months or even years. The better the surgeon, the better your chances of short term problems with this, and also with ED. You want to know how many surgeries your doctor has done, and what his success rate is. Fortunately, I have an acquaintance who had the same procedure by the same doctor 18 weeks ago and he has shared his story with me. If I have even half his success, I will feel fortunate.

This brings us up to date. I am having my procedure next week and the surgery will be done robotically. I have been exercising more and avoiding desserts in the hopes of losing a few pounds, making a little less fat for the doctor to work his way through. I have stopped drinking any alcohol, just to get anything that might slow down my recovery out of my system. I have also been doing Kegel exercises (please Google) which build up the muscles controlling urination. Pregnant women use these, I think pre and post-delivery.

The next installment will be post-surgery, although I’ll discuss whatever you want to discuss before then. If you don’t want to post here, remember I’ll watch for PMs as well. After surgery I will name the facility and doctor involved. I have skipped that so far and I don’t really know why. Maybe superstitious. Okay, post away.

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Old 10-03-2013, 09:30 AM
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Good luck Morris. I hope it goes extremely well. Fingers crossed for you.
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Old 10-03-2013, 10:24 AM
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It seems you have done everything you can do to be prepared.

I was thinking about my uncle who died of metastasized prostate cancer just before his 81st birthday in Dec 1983. I remember taking him for a chemo treatment. I only remember one, but he could have had more. He had previously had the surgery (forgot exactly when that was), but didn't follow up, I'm sure because he decided he wanted to die on his terms. He was an avid hunter and fisherman and well known in NC. We found out the cancer had progressed in Jan of that year. We had just had a big 80th surprise birthday party for him the month before with all his hunting and fishing buddies. He looked great. The last six months were bad, but it was only six months. I suppose this is to say that any decisions you make about care and followup are yours alone to make. Each case is different.
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Old 10-03-2013, 10:29 AM
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Wow. Yes, good luck, Morris. Thank you for sharing. It's very enlightening.
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Old 10-03-2013, 02:20 PM
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Morris, you've answered your first question.... is there any interest in the subject. Based on the replies and views... Yep. I sure hope I never have to make those tough decisions and respect the one you made. As I mentioned in the other thread, my friend made the same decision and the outcome has been great. Wishing you all the best next week and the weeks to come.
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Old 10-03-2013, 03:24 PM
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Thanks for posting, Dean. I was hoping you would. I'm finding your posts to be very informative, and I'm sure I have plenty of company in that regard. So please continue, even if only to vent. Wishing you all the best with your upcoming surgery.
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Old 10-04-2013, 01:57 AM
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I too appreciate your posts on this matter. It is a reminder for those of us who are not men to encourage our spouses or s-os to be very mindful of these issues. I wish you the very, very best and hope all goes well for you. My neighbor had a similar situation several years ago. He appears to be doing great and looks great. Again, I wish you the best and appreciate so much your willingness to share this journey.
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