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the flyby of ultima thule

 
Old 12-31-2018, 04:12 AM
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Default the flyby of ultima thule

for a different way to spend new years eve. you know for us geeks who don't get invited to parties.

New Horizons: Beyond Pluto
coincidentally it will occur just about midnite eastern time.

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Old 12-31-2018, 05:14 AM
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I'll probably sleep thru this...

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Old 12-31-2018, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by boltonblue View Post
for a different way to spend new years eve. you know for us geeks who don't get invited to parties.

New Horizons: Beyond Pluto
coincidentally it will occur just about midnite eastern time.
But the pictures will take about 6 hours to be received here, I believe.
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Old 12-31-2018, 05:37 AM
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Originally Posted by jukngene View Post
But the pictures will take about 6 hours to be received here, I believe.

Hmm. Maybe they should get Fios!
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Old 12-31-2018, 06:41 AM
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Some information about the fly-by:
FAQs:

When will we get the first pictures?:

Due to the small size of Ultima (30km), the spacecraft's cameras can only resolve it just as a couple of pixels until a few hours right before the flyby. Since it takes 6 hours for a signal from the spacecraft to reach Earth, this means the first detailed pictures won't be released until January 2nd.

So the pictures shown today will be the clearest we've ever seen Ultima, but it'll only appear a few pixels across. That's still enough to make scientific discoveries, however- such as Ultima's rotation rate, hints at its shape, whether it has any moons, etc

Why is this flyby important?:

This will be the furthest world ever explored by a spacecraft, we've never been to anything like it before. Ultima is a small frozen asteroid that's sitting at the edge of our solar system. It's important because scientists hope that this asteroid is a remnant of the early system, preserved in a kind of deep-freeze. We suspect it's asteroids like these that delivered to Earth the 'seeds of life' billions of years ago- compounds crucial to the development of life.

What will Ultima Thule look like?:

We've never been to anything like Ultima so we don't know! We’ve never gone to a target in the solar system we knew less about. Ultima Thule will probably be made from exotic material like methane ice, stained a deep red colour by billions of years of exposure to solar & galactic radiation. Its surface will likely be heavily cratered, unlike Pluto.

There's some limited evidence that Ultima may be elongated or peanut-shaped, but the mysterious lack of a light curve has made determining Ultima's shape particularly difficult.
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Old 12-31-2018, 07:12 AM
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During the Jupiter flyby in February 2007, New Horizons sent data home at about 38 kilobits per second (kbps), which is slightly slower than the transmission speed was for acoustic computer modems which operated over telephone lines. The average downlink rate after New Horizons passed Pluto (and sent the bulk of its encounter data back to Earth) was approximately 2,000 bits per second, a rate the spacecraft achieved by downlinking with both of its transmitters through NASA's largest antennas. Even then, it took until late 2016 to bring down all the encounter data stored on the spacecraft's recorders.
Just think how long it would take to transmit back a picture from a reasonable smart phone now?
let's see 12 megapixel x 3 byes... 36 mbytes= 3.77 x 10^7 divided by 2 x 10^3 which is = 1.88 x 106$ or 18874 seconds...
314 minutes.... 5.24 hours per image.... imagine sitting in front of that terminal watching ....loading image ... buffering... loading image...buffering ...
video at 30 fps would be just a bit longer....
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Old 12-31-2018, 07:59 AM
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From what I assume is the age of this probe the signal is probably via a 300 baud modem. Yeah, I remember those.

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Old 12-31-2018, 01:15 PM
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kshshshshshshs kaboing kaboing
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Old 12-31-2018, 03:58 PM
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Why did they name it after a bike rack?
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Old 01-01-2019, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by jukngene View Post
But the pictures will take about 6 hours to be received here, I believe.
6 hours and 7 minutes. The New Horizons spacecraft came to within 2,200 miles. It will resolve image features down to the size of two baseball diamonds. That's amazing. I'm really looking forward to the first images.
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