Go Back  S2KI Honda S2000 Forums > Special Interest > S2000 Vintage Owners
Reload this Page >

The never ending battle against hyperbole

S2000 Vintage Owners Knowledge, age and life experiences represent the members of the Vintage Owners

The never ending battle against hyperbole

 
Old 03-12-2019, 04:03 PM
  #11  
Registered User
 
Hertz Donut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 154
Received 12 Likes on 11 Posts
Default

I swear I come across hyperbole a million times a day.

I read an article on a local site in which a "Mummy blogger" posted about how she was devastated by...the slightly altered flavor of a local licorice. Someone had also responded that their life was ruined by it. Maybe I'll buy up all that licorice and use it to achieve world domination, it sounds like quite the weapon.
Hertz Donut is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 04:14 PM
  #12  
 
windhund116's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 5,845
Received 64 Likes on 61 Posts
Default

windhund116 is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:16 PM
  #13  
tof
 
tof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Long Beach, MS
Posts: 8,901
Likes: 0
Received 16 Likes on 15 Posts
Default

Language changes over time, as does word usage. Thus "Good Job" is just another way of saying "Thanks for doing what I asked". And to children it means only that. Telling the waiter that the appetizer was "awesome" only says "I liked that appetizer. It was good". And that's the message which is received by the person who has heard the appetizer described as "awesome" many times.

But keep fighting the good fight against dilution of adjectives and for the preservation of English in more or less its current form. I applaud your Herculean efforts to stave off the vicious onslaught of attacks that erode the magnificent English spoken word.

Seriously, though, I agree with your point. I wonder if this trend is unique to English or if it is happening in other languages. Commerce being what it is (and I blame advertising at least in part), I expect the problem is widespread.
tof is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:01 PM
  #14  
Thread Starter
 
Legal Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Canton, MA
Posts: 33,015
Received 42 Likes on 38 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by tof View Post
Language changes over time, as does word usage. Thus "Good Job" is just another way of saying "Thanks for doing what I asked". And to children it means only that. Telling the waiter that the appetizer was "awesome" only says "I liked that appetizer. It was good". And that's the message which is received by the person who has heard the appetizer described as "awesome" many times.

But keep fighting the good fight against dilution of adjectives and for the preservation of English in more or less its current form. I applaud your Herculean efforts to stave off the vicious onslaught of attacks that erode the magnificent English spoken word.

Seriously, though, I agree with your point. I wonder if this trend is unique to English or if it is happening in other languages. Commerce being what it is (and I blame advertising at least in part), I expect the problem is widespread.
So once every word that embodies an extreme is diluted to the point that it expresses the mundane, how do we convey the extreme?
Legal Bill is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:03 PM
  #15  
tof
 
tof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Long Beach, MS
Posts: 8,901
Likes: 0
Received 16 Likes on 15 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Legal Bill View Post
So once every word that embodies an extreme is diluted to the point that it expresses the mundane, how do we convey the extreme?
I guess "the kids" will make up new words and phrases, or give old ones new meaning. Full Stop.

tof is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:22 PM
  #16  
Thread Starter
 
Legal Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Canton, MA
Posts: 33,015
Received 42 Likes on 38 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by tof View Post
I guess "the kids" will make up new words and phrases, or give old ones new meaning. Full Stop.

That's a nice story.
Legal Bill is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:35 PM
  #17  
 
dlq04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mish-she-gan
Posts: 29,698
Received 53 Likes on 49 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by tof View Post
I guess "the kids" will make up new words and phrases, or give old ones new meaning. Full Stop.

Damn right. I still say "that's cool" and both young and old still get it. I may not talk their talk but that's ok as well. I really think it is commercial ads and reporters, both written and verbal, that beat to death the words Bill is worrying about. Thankfully, I fastforward thru almost all of them, so its ok.
dlq04 is offline  
Old 03-12-2019, 10:39 PM
  #18  
 
Kyras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 35,993
Received 29 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

Rad post, Bill! Like totally, to the max!
Kyras is offline  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:39 AM
  #19  
Thread Starter
 
Legal Bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Canton, MA
Posts: 33,015
Received 42 Likes on 38 Posts
Default

Here is the incontestable assessment of your posts:

Sue and Tachus, spot on. AWESOME posts. (all caps means "very good.")

Dave, Kids saying "cool" was an adoption by the young of a meaning created by the American Jazz culture. It was both creative and a departure from the actual meaning of the original word. At worst, the second meaning might cause confusion (the water at the beach is cool). But this has nothing to do with adults applying words of extreme to characterize events or things slightly better or worse than mundane. Kids didn't dilute these words. It all started with adults. Your position on giving kids exaggerated encouragement is pretty much the reason the problem was created and won't be solved. It now spans at least two generations. While I agree with most of your comments on the media, I don't think everyone has the same reaction as you when they read and hear these words in the news. They were once reserved for "yellow" journalists. Now they are commonplace in the mainstream media. And I see more people acting "outraged" over issues of less importance.

Mike, yeah, sorry, but I don't see any support for your opinion-presented-as-fact that people only "hear" what is actually meant. Nor do I see any basis for your "new word" prognostication. This has been going on for decades now. Where are the new words?

Hertz, good example.

Windhund, that just seems like advertising.

Patty, yup. People used to be creative.
Legal Bill is offline  
Old 03-13-2019, 05:56 AM
  #20  
 
Lainey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Smalltown
Posts: 55,513
Received 45 Likes on 42 Posts
Default

Bill you are an awesome person with excellent writing skills. You could be a lawyer or something if you applied yourself....
Lainey is offline  

Quick Reply: The never ending battle against hyperbole


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands