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*Red Light Camera's in Ottawa! watch out!*

#1 User is offline   hapa 

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  Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:06 PM

I found this handy link. I know Fongu got a ticket a year or two ago so I thought I'd post this to help you guys out! Beware!!!!

Where are the intersection locations of red light cameras in Ottawa?


The eight intersections being equipped with red light cameras are:

Albert Street & Kent Street
Bronson Avenue & Carling Avenue
Carling Avenue & Richmond Road
Coventry/Ogilvie Road & St. Laurent Boulevard
Merivale Road & Meadowlands Drive
St. Joseph Boulevard & Jeanne d'Arc
Eagleson Road & Hazeldean Road
Heron Road & Riverside Drive
Will the intersections with red light cameras be signed to warn motorists?

No. This would defeat the purpose of the program-drivers would quickly learn the camera locations and adjust their behaviour accordingly. Studies suggest there are no safety benefits when the cameras are signed.


How is the red-light violation documented?

The red-light camera takes two photographs. The first photo is taken when a vehicle with a red light is about to enter an intersection. The second photograph shows the offending vehicle in the intersection. Both photos show the rear of the offending vehicle only.

Do the cameras photograph every vehicle passing through an intersection?

No. The cameras photograph only those vehicles entering an intersection after the light has turned red. Motorists who enter during a yellow light and are in the intersection when the light changes will not be photographed.

Can vehicle owners obstruct their license plates?

No. It is against the law to obstruct a vehicle's license plate.

Do the cameras also record violations at night?

Yes. The cameras can record violations in darkness.

What about cyclists who run red lights?

The red-light cameras will not detect and photograph cyclists who are red light runners. Although cyclists are subject to the same light regulations as motorists, there is no current registration system that could verify a cyclists' identity in a photograph. Additional police enforcement as part of the Intersection Safety Program to Reduce Red Light Running will include a crackdown on cyclists' violations.


Isn't regular police enforcement enough?

It is difficult for police to enforce red-light respect because they must follow offenders through the light in order to catch them. This can endanger other motorists, cyclists and pedestrians as well as the officers.

Communities can't afford to have police patrol intersections as often as necessary to catch red-light runners. The cameras will allow police to focus on other enforcement needs.

How will the police be affected by the Program?

The two-year project will involve an improved police-enforcement strategy. Thirty more sites have been selected from all participating municipalities in Ontario to receive stepped-up police enforcement. In Ottawa, additional intersection sites will be selected for six four-week-long enforcement blitzes. Each new site will receive ten random days of camera enforcement during blitz periods.

Who receives the ticket for running a red light? What is the fine?

No matter who was driving the vehicle at the time of the photograph, the registered owner of the photographed vehicle receives the ticket. The owner's insurance company will not be notified of the violation.

The fine is $155 plus a $35 victim surcharge. If the fine goes unpaid, the license plate cannot be renewed. The owner's driver license is not suspended for any unpaid fine, and no jail term can be imposed for the offence or for fine default.

Will the registered vehicle owner receive any demerit points?

No, but red-light runners ticketed by police and subsequently convicted will receive three demerit points.


How are violations processed?

All evidence gathered from red-light cameras is processed as follows:

developed rolls of red light camera film are sent to the centralized processing centre (the City of Toronto's Transportation Services);

images from the film are digitized and retrieved with the aid of a computer;

all images are reviewed by a Provincial Offences Officer to verify that an offence has occurred;

the license plate number is read from the digital image; and

an Offence Notice Form is completed and mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle.

The court system is responsible for trials and appeals.



Do red light cameras violate privacy?


No. By obtaining a license, motorists agree to abide by rules governed by the Highway Traffic Act. Motorists themselves are not be observed or documented. Red-light cameras photograph a vehicle's rear license plate only-not its driver or occupants.

The City consulted the Province's Information and Privacy Commissioner to ensure the cameras do not violate driver privacy.


Who has access to the violation photos?

Photos gathered for evidence are used only to verify that an offence has occurred and to record license-plate numbers. Officials at the Centralized Processing Centre keep the photos. If a defendant requests a trial, the centre is must help the Crown Prosecutor by providing the original violation photos and certified plate registration information. These photos, when entered into evidence, become public record.


How much does a red-light camera cost?

The cost totals to about $100,000. The City's budget for two cameras operating at eight locations during the two-year pilot program is $1.46 million. This includes:

start-up costs,
engineering,
equipment purchase,
installation,
maintenance,
operating costs and
stepped-up police enforcement of red-light running at other intersections.
What other jurisdictions/countries use red light cameras?

Red light cameras have been used throughout North America, Europe and Asia.

What happens after the two-year pilot program is finished?

The City will evaluate the red-light camera program to assess the combined effect of using the camera systems and stepped-up police enforcement. The province with will study before-and-after data gathered from intersections using cameras, stepped-up police enforcement sites and intersections receiving routine police enforcement. The data will be used to complete interim and final reports including the cost and effectiveness of the program.





#2 User is offline   wing 

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Posted 27 April 2006 - 09:16 PM

Quote

Will the intersections with red light cameras be signed to warn motorists?

No. This would defeat the purpose of the program-drivers would quickly learn the camera locations and adjust their behaviour accordingly. Studies suggest there are no safety benefits when the cameras are signed.


Hazeldean and Eagleson has signs, on all 4 corners.

The other thing to note is that not all cameras are active at all times, they rotate them around.
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#3 User is offline   hapa 

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 08:53 PM

Only one camera I go by on a regular basis

Bronson Avenue & Carling Avenue

#4 User is offline   yellowlab 

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 06:38 PM

here's the link to the actual law and how it's enforced. you'll have to X & V it into your address bar.
http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/regs/engl...gs_990277_e.htm :rules:
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