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Thermal Expansion Coefficients

 
Old 02-20-2019, 11:58 AM
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Default Thermal Expansion Coefficients

Hi,

does anybody know the Thermal Expansion Coefficients of the Cylinder Head and the Intake/Exhaust Valves?
I am considering using custom-made valve guides and I want to determine the correct dimensions.
Thank you for your help.

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Old 05-05-2019, 08:56 AM
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Look in your solid mechanics textbook, I don't understand why you're asking this in a thread
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Old 05-05-2019, 09:54 AM
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If you can tell me the exact alloys which Honda used, I will look it up.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:56 PM
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Send a sample to a materials lab and they can perform EDS on it and give you the exact composition of the alloy, maybe they even have a match in their library.

Or look in your textbook and take an average for 2011 through 7075 since they're all a few tenths apart from each other. The maximum delta is .08x10^-6/degC, in this order of magnitude you are not going to see an appreciable deformation regardless which value you use.

Or just eyeball the table and use 23.4x10^-6/degC.

For OEM valves you will have to perform EDS. Honda is on top of their materials game and their engineering team is annoyingly hardcore and meticulous, I highly doubt you will find accurate information of what exact alloy was used.
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Old 05-06-2019, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by rocketstarter View Post
Send a sample to a materials lab and they can perform EDS on it and give you the exact composition of the alloy, maybe they even have a match in their library.

Or look in your textbook and take an average for 2011 through 7075 since they're all a few tenths apart from each other. The maximum delta is .08x10^-6/degC, in this order of magnitude you are not going to see an appreciable deformation regardless which value you use.

Or just eyeball the table and use 23.4x10^-6/degC.

For OEM valves you will have to perform EDS. Honda is on top of their materials game and their engineering team is annoyingly hardcore and meticulous, I highly doubt you will find accurate information of what exact alloy was used.
Yeah you'd basically have to know a Honda engineer that worked on cyl heads / metallurgy from the 90's to really figure this out unless you wanted to do some destructive testing and pay a bunch of money.
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